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Bilingual people are able to use their different languages in different places, with different people and for different purposes.
Duration: 01:33
Parents are pleased with new approaches to bilingual learning. They see the advantages that children get from using both their languages.
Duration: 02:43
Research shows that there are clear educational advantages in bilingual learning, but using a Pasifika language has sometimes been considered a liability.
Duration: 01:26
Research shows that the teacher's interest, respect and care for the student is an important factor in student achievement in school.
Duration: 01:44
Academic language, and particularly academic vocabulary, is a high priority for bilingual students, across all curriculum areas.
Duration: 04:02
It’s about creating environments with students at the centre, where Pasifika students have the focus and learning support they need to lift their academic achievement patterns.
Duration: 4:21
Mutually respectful, caring and open relationships, which motivate and engage Pasifika students, form the heart of effective teaching.
Duration: 5:11
School leaders have a role in establishing practices that support the continuity of their Pasifika students’ learning as they move from and into different learning environments.
Duration: 2:48
By integrating culture, caring, challenge and support into their pedagogies, teachers strengthen relationships and build communities of learners who succeed socially and academically.
Duration: 6:21
Inclusive pedagogies, where teachers deliberately and positively draw on their Pasifika students’ resources, value the diversity of student experience and help to lift Pasifika student achievement.
Duration: 2:06
High expectations, together with the vision of Pasifika students as successful learners, improve relationships, pedagogy and academic outcomes.
Duration: 6:17
Safe and supportive environments, with coherent, clear and consistently enforced codes of behaviour and restorative discipline practices, contribute to learning gains for Pasifika students.
Duration: 4:30
Collecting relevant and sufficient data on Pasifika students’ achievement helps schools to track the progress of their Pasifika learners, make informed changes to their pedagogy, programmes and practices and be affirmed when their data reveals learning gains.
Duration: 05:50
Pasifika students find it motivating when teachers keep them informed about their levels of achievement, share the learning intentions with them and adjust their teaching to scaffold their learning pathways so that they know exactly what to do next.
Duration: 04:38
Teachers use many different strategies to engage their Pasifika learners and help them to achieve. Their strategies work best when they are grounded in responsive and caring relationships with their Pasifika students and the focus on their learning is clear.
Duration: 05:03
When teachers and Pasifika students negotiate the learning intentions, and share clear expectations and knowledge of the outcomes to be achieved, Pasifika students engage more confidently and more purposefully in their learning.
Duration: 04:16
Pasifika students benefit from working in collaborative ways with their peers in the classroom.
Duration: 02:31
Knowing a Pasifika language is not a barrier to being successful in English-medium schooling. Teachers who value and share the languages that Pasifika students bring with them into the classroom and deliberately build their English language skills help their Pasifika students to succeed.
Duration: 02:43
Collaboration, inquiry learning and knowledge-sharing underpin the professional development and learning focus of the teachers at Māngere Bridge school. The learning and actions that result impact positively on their Pasifika students’ achievement and well-being.
Duration: 04:14
McAuley High School has an unrelenting focus on raising the achievement of their Pasifika students. School-based teacher professional learning and development enables teachers to collectively inquire into and identify what works well for their Pasifika students.
Duration: 03:39
School leaders who initiate and sustain an intensive focus on the teaching-learning relationship and promote collective responsibility and accountability for Pasifika students’ achievement and well-being can make a difference to the outcomes their Pasifika students achieve.
Duration: 01:01
Negative stereotyping and a culture of mocking can be positively transformed by providing opportunities for Pasifika students to learn and grow their leadership potential, take ownership of their own development and be celebrated as achievers.
Duration: 03:02
This clip is from the Connections and Conversations DVD. The DVD and accompanying booklet can be ordered via email from orders@thechair.minedu.govt.nz or phone 0800 226 440. Quote Item number 11061.


This part highlights a variety of viewpoints on the range of different contexts and worlds that Pasifika students inhabit.These different contexts can provide challenges for some students. At the same time, they also can provide a basis for learning.
Duration: 5:43
This clip is from the Connections and Conversations DVD. The DVD and accompanying booklet can be ordered via email from orders@thechair.minedu.govt.nz or phone 0800 226 440. Quote Item number 11061.

This part considers the potentially differing expectations of teachers and parents towards Pasifika students and their learning.
Duration: 4:14
This clip is from the Connections and Conversations DVD. The DVD and accompanying booklet can be ordered via email from orders@thechair.minedu.govt.nz or phone 0800 226 440. Quote Item number 11061.

This part explores a variety of viewpoints from students, teachers and parents on the involvement and engagement of Pasifika parents and communities in the processes of schooling.
Duration: 11:26
This clip is from the Connections and Conversations DVD. The DVD and accompanying booklet can be ordered via email from orders@thechair.minedu.govt.nz or phone 0800 226 440. Quote Item number 11061.

This part considers the diversity within our groups of Pasifika students and their communities in terms of their identities, languages, experiences and aspirations.
Duration: 9:44
Many schools already involve Pasifika parents in supporting cultural events and activities. However, it should not stop there. Home-school partnerships that have a clear focus on Pasifika students’ learning with everyone able to make a positive and active contribution directly benefit Pasifika learners.
Duration: 04:16
Partnerships that share and align school and home practices and enable parents to actively support their children's in-school learning have shown some of the strongest impacts on student outcomes.
Duration: 03:29
Coming to school for special events is rewarding for Pasifika parents if the school makes them feel welcome and the focus is on their children’s achievement and strategies to extend their learning.
Duration: 01:46
Sustained higher achievement is possible when teachers use pedagogical approaches and share strategies that enable Pasifika students to take charge of their own learning.
Duration: 05:56
Sylvia Park school has set up a centre to be ‘the parents’ place’ within the school. The centre’s leader has a proactive focus on involving Pasifika parents through mutual learning conversations based on their child’s assessment data and their next-steps learning needs.
Duration: 03:56
Many schools already involve Pasifika parents in supporting cultural events and activities. However, it should not stop there. Home-school partnerships that have a clear focus on Pasifika students’ learning with everyone able to make a positive and active contribution directly benefit Pasifika learners.
Duration: 04:16

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Duration: 05:56

Sustained higher achievement is possible when teachers use pedagogical approaches and share strategies that enable Pasifika students to take charge of their own learning.

Key content

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Key content

Where Pasifika students are part of the conversation about their learning and achievements, they gain deeper understanding of their own specific learning needs and challenges. Approaches such as ‘learning conversations’ foster Pasifika students' abilities to define their own learning goals, ask questions, anticipate the structure of curriculum experiences, use meta-cognitive strategies when engaging with curriculum and self-monitor. When Pasifika parents are included in the conversation, they gain knowledge about their child’s learning in language that they can understand.

Pasifika parents who extend their range of strategies to help their children learn and do well in school are also empowered to support their preschool children as well. Those parents, family and community members who volunteer to help at school also increase their ability to influence their children's educational outcomes.

“Students learn as they engage in shared activities and conversations with other people, including family members and people in the wider community. Teachers encourage this process by cultivating the class as a learning community. In such a community, everyone, including the teacher, is a learner; learning conversations and learning partnerships are encouraged; and challenge, support and feedback are always available. As they engage in reflective discourse with others, students build the language that they need to take their learning further.”
The New Zealand Curriculum, page 34.

Acknowledgment:

Thanks to the principals, staff and students of Aorere College, McAuley High School, Mangere Bridge School, Sylvia Park School, Mary MacKillop School and Wymondley Road Primary School for their contribution.

Things to think about

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Things to think about

  • What is your understanding of good teaching for Pasifika students? How is that different from your understanding of good teaching for other students? On what do you base these understandings? And how do you share these?
  • How do you go about establishing common ways to think about the nature of high-quality teaching for Pasifika students?
  • To what extent do teachers in your school have a deliberate and collective focus on reviewing their teaching approaches in relation to Pasifika student achievement patterns? Could this focus be strengthened? In what ways? What would happen as a result?
  • Do the conversations you have with other teachers about the achievement of Pasifika students in your school provide you with a professional learning opportunity? If not, how could they be improved?
  • Is there any particular teaching style or technique you use that works particularly well for Pasifika students in the classroom? Who do you share this information with? If you do not share these things, why not?

Transcript

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Transcript

Judy Hanna
What I believe is that by involving the parents with their children, is the way to get the parents involved in the children’s learning by making their children part of the conversation. And today was a good example. We invited the parents to come and have lunch with their children at school, and we had a wonderful turnout.

Jan Bills
It's about making friends; it's about feeling comfortable with each other. It's about making cross connections, it's about knowing what each person is capable of doing before asking them if they can help you in some way. And it's about building the relationship. The luncheon was fun and I think it involved the kids and the parents, and everybody had a great time, and they’re keen to do it again, so it's about building on that. I think the fun thing is really important actually. It’s important for the kids and for the parents to enjoy themselves. It can get serious sometimes, and it's not supposed to be serious.

Merita Amani-Heisifa
We do student lead conferences, where the students report back their learning of the term so that's another way we get our parents involved in their learning. Like next week year 5 to 8 will be celebrating their topic with the parents. So we invite them to come in, have a look at what their children have been learning. We have some wonderful Pasifika parents, who are very supportive of their children, but we would like more.

Melanie - student
We come in and the teacher tells our parents what we've been doing and sometimes the kids talk about it. And tell our parents like how we’re doing in our learning. And sometimes our parents ask questions about what we need to work on and how they can help us achieve our goals.

Ana Manu
Sometimes teachers don't realise when they are talking to a parent that the language that they use are everyday teacher language. But most parents don't know what that means, and especially Pasifika, they’re really shy to ask what does that mean without having to look really silly, so sometimes just saying simple things, um, makes a lot of sense to the parents.

Jan Bills
I think what the parent interview do is it helps Pasifika parents to understand the kind of learning that their children do at school. It also gives them the power to understand the sort of language that schools use, and so when they’re having a conversation with the children it helps them to know what to ask their children.

Actuality - Student led conference: Marcel

It helps for all three people to be speaking that same language. I think too in the parent interview when the child is there it focuses the interview on the child. Not on the parent's needs, not on the teacher's needs, because sometimes they can have their own particular needs. But actually on the needs of the child, and the child keeps it as a focus, it's the centre.

Actuality - Student led conference: Marcel

Marcel - student
The parents get to know your teacher and see if your child’s doing all right and see what they need to improve on, see what they’re good at at the school.

Glen Ryan
What we ‘ve done this term is we've invited the new children to come into the school, the parents to come in and the child has invited them, so it makes it easier for the parent to come, cause you can't turn your five year old down, you've got to come. Together with the DP the five-year old will present their learning and what they are up to. At the same time we are also finding out the siblings, and getting the relationship with them, making them feel at ease and then offering them what we can help them with. Having little workshops that they can come to with other parents around reading, writing, whatever they'd like to know about, we’re hoping that will go back into the family and support the 2 year old, the 3-year-old who’s coming through. So we are going to work through our new children to help out the ones that are coming through. We'll see how it goes.

Malia - student
We like give invitations to them and the students families, to come and support their children, so they won’t feel left out. And they get involved in the students learning as well.

Jacqueline Yates
I think one of the successes in my class is the parents and the communication I have with them. Because I know when those kids go home, if the parents are on the same track as me, we’re going to get those kids moving. And they do. I know the kids that are working at home they come back and I see movement. I see movement over the holidays, I see movement from the weekend and then I can grab that and I can move them at school. And they’ve got every chance of success. And the parents I tell them they’re welcome to come into my class anytime and they do.

Actuality – parents working with kids in Jacqueline’s classroom

Then I’ve got the parents that come in and help, I sit them at a table with a little group of kids and what I like about that is that they’re learning as well. I’ll be doing an activity with the kids and they’ll say, oh that’s a good idea, oh that’s a good idea, I’m going to do that at home, and then they go and play the game at home that they’ve just seen. So I’m very lucky to have that, have that parent support. And alternatively, they teach me things. They teach me the language; they teach me what goes on at home. Which is very important for me to understand where my kids have come from.


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