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Bilingual people are able to use their different languages in different places, with different people and for different purposes.
Duration: 01:33
Parents are pleased with new approaches to bilingual learning. They see the advantages that children get from using both their languages.
Duration: 02:43
Research shows that there are clear educational advantages in bilingual learning, but using a Pasifika language has sometimes been considered a liability.
Duration: 01:26
Research shows that the teacher's interest, respect and care for the student is an important factor in student achievement in school.
Duration: 01:44
Academic language, and particularly academic vocabulary, is a high priority for bilingual students, across all curriculum areas.
Duration: 04:02
It’s about creating environments with students at the centre, where Pasifika students have the focus and learning support they need to lift their academic achievement patterns.
Duration: 4:21
Mutually respectful, caring and open relationships, which motivate and engage Pasifika students, form the heart of effective teaching.
Duration: 5:11
School leaders have a role in establishing practices that support the continuity of their Pasifika students’ learning as they move from and into different learning environments.
Duration: 2:48
By integrating culture, caring, challenge and support into their pedagogies, teachers strengthen relationships and build communities of learners who succeed socially and academically.
Duration: 6:21
Inclusive pedagogies, where teachers deliberately and positively draw on their Pasifika students’ resources, value the diversity of student experience and help to lift Pasifika student achievement.
Duration: 2:06
High expectations, together with the vision of Pasifika students as successful learners, improve relationships, pedagogy and academic outcomes.
Duration: 6:17
Safe and supportive environments, with coherent, clear and consistently enforced codes of behaviour and restorative discipline practices, contribute to learning gains for Pasifika students.
Duration: 4:30
Collecting relevant and sufficient data on Pasifika students’ achievement helps schools to track the progress of their Pasifika learners, make informed changes to their pedagogy, programmes and practices and be affirmed when their data reveals learning gains.
Duration: 05:50
Pasifika students find it motivating when teachers keep them informed about their levels of achievement, share the learning intentions with them and adjust their teaching to scaffold their learning pathways so that they know exactly what to do next.
Duration: 04:38
Teachers use many different strategies to engage their Pasifika learners and help them to achieve. Their strategies work best when they are grounded in responsive and caring relationships with their Pasifika students and the focus on their learning is clear.
Duration: 05:03
When teachers and Pasifika students negotiate the learning intentions, and share clear expectations and knowledge of the outcomes to be achieved, Pasifika students engage more confidently and more purposefully in their learning.
Duration: 04:16
Pasifika students benefit from working in collaborative ways with their peers in the classroom.
Duration: 02:31
Knowing a Pasifika language is not a barrier to being successful in English-medium schooling. Teachers who value and share the languages that Pasifika students bring with them into the classroom and deliberately build their English language skills help their Pasifika students to succeed.
Duration: 02:43
Collaboration, inquiry learning and knowledge-sharing underpin the professional development and learning focus of the teachers at Māngere Bridge school. The learning and actions that result impact positively on their Pasifika students’ achievement and well-being.
Duration: 04:14
McAuley High School has an unrelenting focus on raising the achievement of their Pasifika students. School-based teacher professional learning and development enables teachers to collectively inquire into and identify what works well for their Pasifika students.
Duration: 03:39
School leaders who initiate and sustain an intensive focus on the teaching-learning relationship and promote collective responsibility and accountability for Pasifika students’ achievement and well-being can make a difference to the outcomes their Pasifika students achieve.
Duration: 01:01
Negative stereotyping and a culture of mocking can be positively transformed by providing opportunities for Pasifika students to learn and grow their leadership potential, take ownership of their own development and be celebrated as achievers.
Duration: 03:02
This clip is from the Connections and Conversations DVD. The DVD and accompanying booklet can be ordered via email from orders@thechair.minedu.govt.nz or phone 0800 226 440. Quote Item number 11061.


This part highlights a variety of viewpoints on the range of different contexts and worlds that Pasifika students inhabit.These different contexts can provide challenges for some students. At the same time, they also can provide a basis for learning.
Duration: 5:43
This clip is from the Connections and Conversations DVD. The DVD and accompanying booklet can be ordered via email from orders@thechair.minedu.govt.nz or phone 0800 226 440. Quote Item number 11061.

This part considers the potentially differing expectations of teachers and parents towards Pasifika students and their learning.
Duration: 4:14
This clip is from the Connections and Conversations DVD. The DVD and accompanying booklet can be ordered via email from orders@thechair.minedu.govt.nz or phone 0800 226 440. Quote Item number 11061.

This part explores a variety of viewpoints from students, teachers and parents on the involvement and engagement of Pasifika parents and communities in the processes of schooling.
Duration: 11:26
This clip is from the Connections and Conversations DVD. The DVD and accompanying booklet can be ordered via email from orders@thechair.minedu.govt.nz or phone 0800 226 440. Quote Item number 11061.

This part considers the diversity within our groups of Pasifika students and their communities in terms of their identities, languages, experiences and aspirations.
Duration: 9:44
Many schools already involve Pasifika parents in supporting cultural events and activities. However, it should not stop there. Home-school partnerships that have a clear focus on Pasifika students’ learning with everyone able to make a positive and active contribution directly benefit Pasifika learners.
Duration: 04:16
Partnerships that share and align school and home practices and enable parents to actively support their children's in-school learning have shown some of the strongest impacts on student outcomes.
Duration: 03:29
Coming to school for special events is rewarding for Pasifika parents if the school makes them feel welcome and the focus is on their children’s achievement and strategies to extend their learning.
Duration: 01:46
Sustained higher achievement is possible when teachers use pedagogical approaches and share strategies that enable Pasifika students to take charge of their own learning.
Duration: 05:56
Sylvia Park school has set up a centre to be ‘the parents’ place’ within the school. The centre’s leader has a proactive focus on involving Pasifika parents through mutual learning conversations based on their child’s assessment data and their next-steps learning needs.
Duration: 03:56
Many schools already involve Pasifika parents in supporting cultural events and activities. However, it should not stop there. Home-school partnerships that have a clear focus on Pasifika students’ learning with everyone able to make a positive and active contribution directly benefit Pasifika learners.
Duration: 04:16

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Duration: 05:03

Teachers use many different strategies to engage their Pasifika learners and help them to achieve. Their strategies work best when they are grounded in responsive and caring relationships with their Pasifika students and the focus on their learning is clear.

Key content

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Key content

Successful teachers have many different ways of helping their Pasifika students to learn and achieve. These teachers adapt their pedagogy to the needs, interests, language and culture of their Pasifika learners, enjoying them as individuals and caring about them as learners. While keeping the lesson’s learning focus clear and explicit, they use strategies that motivate, engage, challenge and support their Pasifika learners in ways that help them to become confident, successful and independent learners.
“If we are to make a difference to students, improving teaching practice should not be considered an end in itself but should be judged according to the impact on students”. Teacher Professional Learning and Development: Best Evidence Synthesis Iteration, page 12

Acknowledgment:

Thanks to the principals, staff and students of Aorere College, McAuley High School, Mangere Bridge School, Sylvia Park School, Mary MacKillop School and Wymondley Road Primary School for their contribution.

Things to think about

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Things to think about

  • What impact do the strategies you use have on your Pasifika students? Are some more successful than others? How do you know?
  • Do you feel that you are constantly improving your teaching practice to be responsive to your Pasifika learners? If so, in what ways? If not, why not?
  • Can you give examples of some strategies that you have used and find particularly effective with your Pasifika students? What outcomes have they achieved as a result? Have you shared this information with others? If so, who? If not, why not?
  • Do you ask other teachers about the strategies they use with their Pasifika students and which ones they find particularly successful? If not, would that be a useful thing for you to do?
  • What do you think you need to know in order to deepen your professional understandings (for example, your pedagogical content knowledge) and extend your skills so as to have a positive impact on your Pasifika students’ learning outcomes? If there are things you think you need to learn, how will you go about doing this?

Transcript

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Transcript

Inna - student
I like learning off people who actually enjoy themselves and are fun. You know someone who gets excited about teaching.
Gus - student
I think a good teacher is someone who can lead you in the right direction so you can go on independently.
Camilla - student
Even when we don't get it they will try and find another way for us to understand. It's good when they explain it properly.
Liz Crisp
A style of learning which allows Pasifika children to engage in hands on way is particularly effective. I think it's effective for other children too, but particularly so for Pasifika children. Young children who come in and haven't had a lot of experience with English, immediately that gives them a context to talk. And I think talking, explaining, making connections, and realising that they have a lot to bring to the classroom is really important.
ACTUALITY
Jacqueline Yates
I like to keep my kids moving all the time that's why I go outside a lot. I incorporate music in my lessons, art work, but it’s still at quite a high level of academics, I expect them to – it’s not just playing around, so also having a sense of humour with these kids they just love it. And I think what happens is that they build that respect for you, so that you’re joking with them, and it’s about keeping their attention.
ACTUALITY
Aina Masina
My teaching style is broken down in sort of like a process of doing things, step by step ... making sure that all the kids are following the step. The steps that I’ve wanted them to achieve by the end of the lesson.
ACTUALITY – Aina teaching in class
So you want to give them a little bit at a time and then you move onto something else. I like to keep it quick and fast.
ACTUALITY – Aina teaching in class
They can get easily bored, distracted, and they go off task. But if you keep the task simple, challenging, but effective where they’re doing things together, I think I will get more out of the lesson.
Faaifo - student
A good teacher give us strategies to work out problems and they have lots of fun with us.
Moyeen McCoy
I can't just say ‘oh girls you know you're going to do an essay today, you know go to it’. I have to take them through step by step a pathway to achieve that and to explain how to do things in each part of the structure. So I would use writing frames for that, or some sort of structure that might not be as complex as a writing frame in its total entirety, but it will be a form of structure. Because I'm a visual thinker, a lot of our girls are and they find it helpful to have a framework, even if it's a metaphorical framework.
Jacqueline Yates
First thing I probably look at is their learning styles. So I look at how they learn, do they like to learn through touch, do they like to learn through singing, do they like to learn just through rote learning – for example when I’m doing maths – I try and incorporate music and I take teaching points through the songs that I’m doing or I will use playdoh and they have to break the playdoh up and count the dots or make playdoh numbers. I do alot of learning outside, so we play games outside so that I’m catering to the children who need to release alot of energy.
ACTUALITY – Jacqueline teaching in class


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